We now have two pairs of barn owls and lapwings nesting on the farm.

Conservation considerations have driven our business decisions throughout the 30 years we've been at Burwash Manor.

Historically, Burwash Manor has had no woodland that we know of, and what few trees we had were mostly Elms that were all lost in the 1970s, to Dutch Elm Disease. So we've been busy ...

Several thousand yards of new hedgerow have been set, many hundreds of trees have been planted in over a dozen small spinney's scattered across the (previously treeless) farm, and several miles of flower rich tussocky grass strips have been established. A network of permissive paths now allows the public into our farm.

We now have two pairs of barn owls and lapwings nesting on the farm after many years absence.

These measures, plus many others, have lead (against the national trend) to increasing numbers of all the birds that we worry about; skylark, corn bunting, English partridge, yellow hammer, hobby etc. We now have two pairs of barn owls and lapwings nesting on the farm after many years absence. Burwash Manor Farm has received a number of awards in recognition of these achievements.

In 2000, the farm became certified as an organic farm and for the past three years Burwash Manor has been part of the Higher Level Stewardship Scheme. HLS has helped to fund our newest and one of our most important wildlife assets, a pond and wetland complex aimed at providing new dragonfly habitat.

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